Supporting Cellos at Foxes Music

Today we have a unique showcase for displaying Cellos custom built by Stefan Dromlewicz, Woodworking contractor from Waldorf, Maryland, for Foxes Music in Falls Church, Virginia.

The piece was custom designed for the owner, and made from White Oak Plywood panels and solids, hand finished in a water based gloss polyurethane.

The cabinet features steel angle supports, bump rails, and assembly with finish screws for easy modification.  It can hold 13 Cellos.

David with the fully populated Cello rack.
David with the fully populated Cello rack.
David and Stefan with the fully populated Cello rack.
David going to get another Cello…. And another Cello…
View from the back of Foxes Music Co.
SEE? I told you the Cellos would fit….
Finished display rack, spent woodworker!
I built this! Look! (doing happy dance)
A lot of work went into this. (reflective moment).
David and Stefan with completed display!

 

The instrument slots feature padding to protect the neck of the cello, as well as the body, and turn the instrument  approximately 30 degrees for added visibility.

The Cello display is a complement to the Violin display (not pictured).

Congratulations to Stefan and Foxes Music for this wonderful display!

 

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The Last Word
Nerf display case – for the Zombie Apocalypse!

Display Cases You Can Build (Popular Woodworking)

Display Cases You Can Build (Popular Woodworking) – from Amazon Books.

 

 

How do timber cells affect the appearance of timber grain?

IF the cells of the wood are uniform, they have a uniform appearance; any visible defect (many of which appear after drying) will cause uneven gain, drying marks, fungal or other damage to the appearance of the wood.[1] [2]


Most common of these are sticker stain, which appears in wood that has been dried incorrectly.[3] [4]

(Image from Popular woodworking)

When finishing wood that has defects, and won’t take stain readily, you sometimes have to use a transparent tinting stain – one that evenly covers the wood. Many species don’t finish well, and this give you a uniform finish. You would need a tint like this:
or this

This is one of my favorites:

When finishing woods that have a high sap content, like Pine (or most of the coniferous woods) you may need to coat them with a pre-finish, so they will take stain more easily.  
Minwax 61500444 Pre Stain Wood Conditioner, 1 Quart
Always test a scrap piece of wood to ensure you get the finish right!  And remember to keep rags and cleaner like Mineral spirits or Lacquer Thinner handy.  Make sure your finishing area is well ventilated, and you clean the surface after sanding with a tack cloth.
Many grain defects don’t show up to the naked eye until you add a stain or finish coat.  
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Footnotes

This is expanded from my answer that originally appeared in Quora on June 29, 2017
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All rights reserved by Alan Chenkin & Primrose Path LLC.  Remember to give credit to the author and any cited works. If you enjoyed this blog, please feel free to share.  Links may be promoted to sponsor sites, but are relevant to the topic. 

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